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IMG_0822

Each child has a super-detailed book timeline, but on our wall we have what I like to call the “Ballpark timeline.” Every century has a saint, an American history event (or something that fueled the quest), a music period, and an artist.

The music people are pictured in the right century, but they don’t have names:
Ars Antiqua- Adam de la Halle
Ars Nova- Guillaume de Machaunt
Renaissance I- Josquin
Renaissance II- Byrd
Baroque- Bach
Classical – Mozart
Romantic – Tchaikovsky
Modern – Copeland

As we study folks, or listen to their music, I put a clothes pin on the right century, thusly:

IMG_0823If you are familiar with the book, Memorize the Faith, that is where I got the saints from.  The rest we added on our own.

Here you go! Click the pic, download, and print.

11th century

12th century

13th century

14th Century

15th century

16th century

17th century

18th century

19th century

20th century

 



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Jean_Piaget_in_Ann_Arbor

Meet Jean Piaget.  Isn’t he CUTE?  He’s this great French scientist that formalized the terms for the developmental stages of children.  He did a lot of work on babies.  People have fussed over whether or not you can nail it down to the month or whatever (all kids are different, right?), but his Big Kid stuff is GREAT!  Also, it’s important to know that his work wasn’t translated into English until a few years after Dorothy Sayers’s “Lost Tools of Learning.”

Who cares?  You do. Lemme back up.

Medieval Trivium/Quadrivium Nutshell

  • To “understand the truth of things” requires certain skills, information, and habits of mind.
  • These skills and habits were developed and standardized into a dependable, time-tested high school/university curriculum exactly AGES & AGES AGO, called Grammar, Logic, Rhetoric
  • These skills were then practiced at university on other “languages”: arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, music, (Quadrivium) hopefully culminating in a person who could reason rightly about anything in the universe, up to and including the highest and most abstract Divine Truths.

Got it?  Great.  None of this has to do with your five year old.  There is no medieval curriculum for your Kindergartner.  Or third grader.  Maybe seventh.  Certainly tenth.

The Confusion

The IMPORTANT piece of information that you will miss, if you, like me, wait YEARS to read the Letter from the Director, is that the overlap in naming our stages after the Medieval Trivium subjects is just that.  An overlap.

It’s totally confusing! Remember that cute old man up there at the top?  If Ms. Sayers had given her talk ten years later, she would have likely used what are now the standard psychology terms:  Pre-Operational, Concrete Operational, Formal Operations, Late Formal.  These correspond exactly with our names.*

  • Primary = Pre-Operational
  • Grammar=Concrete Operational
  • Dialectic = Formal Operations
  • Rhetoric = Late Formal

*Not everyone who uses “classical ed” terminology can switch out the names one-to-one like this.  Some curricula have their stages pulled much earlier or omit the Primary Stage.  It doesn’t line up with brain development.

So, I used to say, “How can I dispose my child towards acquiring the Trivium Arts of Grammar, Logic, and Rhetoric while he’s in the Logic stage?”  Huh?  Now I can say “How can I dispose my child towards acquiring the Trivium Arts of Grammar, Logic, Rhetoric while he’s in early Formal Operations?”

But aren’t the STAGES what makes it Classical?

Nope.  Classical Education, as MODG uses the term, aims the child at acquiring wisdom according to the ancient well-worn paths.  But those paths aren’t drawn out for anyone under 13.  Current Classical Education folks are extrapolating back to include the younger kids.

Dorothy used the Trivium names for the stages, but I can use the truths of brain development to teach the child anything.  Just because we’re memorizing at the right stage doesn’t make it classical.  Just because I recognize that the child now has the ability to follow an argument doesn’t make it classical.  That just makes it “developmentally appropriate.”

And, you can have a “Classical” education that is totally developmentally inappropriate for K-8.  I think I’ve seen several versions of it already. Haven’t you? People use Dorothy’s names for the stages, but they’re 3-5 years EARLY for the actual brain development!  But I would still call it Classical, just developmentally inaccurate.

Thankfully, our curriculum has the stages and ages lined up right, but the overlap in terms can be really confusing, right?

 

 



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Dreadfully Hard Books

Philosophy

Every year in MoDG, there is a “dreadfully hard” book.  It’s taken me years to get a handle on WHY it’s there.  Especially with all the talk about developmental levels and not introducing books to early so as to ruin them.  So what’s up with the “dreadfully hard” book each year? As I understand it […]

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Spelling Printables!

3rd

So, one kid is totally on track, number two is dyslexic, and number three struggles with the physical act of writing: I got through list T or U on WRTR before he went to 7th grade.  He’s a great speller. Next kid is in dyslexia intervention. WRTR is NOT a good solution as some of […]

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WRTR Sanity Script: Weeks 1-2

Phonics/Spelling

WRTR makes people cry. I have written multiple posts on it, but this one is a just GET THROUGH IT post. You can print it out and put in Mari’s book for your personal assignment script. Phase 1: Phonogram only assignments Get some phonogram cards.  I print out these from quizlet. No need to laminate, […]

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True, Good, and Beautiful…Huh?

Philosophy

I wasn’t sold on this whole “true, good, beautiful” thing until recently.   Much of the ugly versus beautiful seemed like ivory tower talk.  However, I’ve found an author that really helps me in this department.  Kevin Vost. Since I want to get to the meat of this quickly, I’m going to report it backwards to […]

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Laura’s Homeschool Christian (2001) Interview

Philosophy

If you paste it into Word, it’s 32 pages LONG!  Anyway, HERE’s the link for the QA session.  The other one, which preceded it, is less practical and more theoretical.  If you are in that mood, it’s great. I have cut and pasted a few excerpts that I found particularly helpful.  All of the bolding […]

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7GRD Timeline Assignments

7th

MOM WORK You could make your kid do this, but I don’t.  Getting those BC pages dated right is mind bending. 1.  Set up your book like I did in this post. 2.  As seen in that post, put the lines, beginning and end dates, and tick marks on the following spreads: p. 25 = […]

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Money Saving Tips: Dealing with the Booklists

Organization

Over the years, finances have changed enough and lifestyle has changed enough that I’m not currently pinching pennies on homeschool.  However, that hasn’t always been (and might not always be.)  I was reminded lately of how distressing extra expenses can be. Advantages of MoDG Methodology I hear people say that our school is really expensive, […]

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I’m in the New York Times!

Not-So-MoDG

Bookshelf: Gone to the Beach By MARIA RUSSO JULY 29, 2015 New picture books take children, animals and a T-Rex on getaways to the shore. Beach House Written by Deanna Caswell. Illustrated by Amy June Bates. The story begins even before the title page of this warmly satisfying book, capturing a family’s unabashed eagerness to […]

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The First Ten Weeks Automation

My Printables

As I mentioned last year, about this time we had a “special” baby.  He’s over that now, but since he needed a lot of care back then, I needed homeschool automated.   It was so successful that I’m doing it again this year. Above you see my sixth grade notebook all dressed and ready to go […]

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Updates to Freebies

My Printables

In putting together the kids’ notebooks this year, I realized that I needed a few things.  I have added these to the printables page, but I wanted to let you know here. 4-7GRD Caswell Saxon Math Pages. We do half of the mixed review and rarely do more than six of the Lesson Practice.  So, […]

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WRTR for Parents: Lesson 10

3rd

This is a continuation of a parent series on WRTR. “Advice” in the Fortune Cookie #29  Say the double letters so you don’t forget them. This is a weird rule to me.  It’s like a recommendation.  It reminds me of when you open a fortune cookie and get “advice” instead of a fortune.  “Don’t cry […]

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WRTR for Parents: Lesson 9

3rd

This is a continuation of a parent series on WRTR. Milk Truck Rule /k/ is really the most difficult sound to spell for us. Rule #25 says, “The phonogram ck may be used only after a single vowel that says its short sound.”  AGAIN, that just doesn’t complete the picture, so we state it this […]

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WRTR for Parents: Lesson 8

3rd

This is a continuation of a parent series on WRTR. #20 S almost never follows X. This is one of the “it is what it is” rules.  When you have an X followed by a /s/ sound, it’s almost always a C.  excited, excel, etc. /s/ Conference (Not-So-MoDG) Above you see the first half of […]

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WRTR for Parents: Lesson 7

3rd

 This is a continuation of a parent series on WRTR. The last couple pages of the spelling notebook are lists of multi-letter phonograms. There are lots of rules, even used in the earliest sections of the spelling lists, that don’t have pages.  So, we’re going to continue with the rules.  NOTE:  If you are using […]

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WRTR for Parents: Lesson 6

3rd

This is a continuation of a parent series on WRTR. Shhhh…Tall, short, and otherwise So, now we are on page 6 of the spelling notebook.  This is rule 13’s page. EXCEPT THAT IT’S MISSING. 13. SH at the beginning of a word, SH at the end (word or syllable), or in the suffix ship. The […]

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WRTR for Parents: Lesson 5

3rd

This is a continuation of a parent series on WRTR. So, now we are on page 4 of the spelling notebook.   I would like to keep showing them to you, but I scare people all the time with my cavalier copyright attitudes. This page in the spelling notebook demonstrates the SECOND suffix rule.  Again, […]

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WRTR for Parents: Lesson 4

3rd

The good news here, is that spelling and reading totally match on the following rules.  Whew! The First Suffix Rule:  #9-10 When you add any suffix-that-starts-with-a-vowel (ing, ed, ish, etc) to a base word, you have to check for the following three rules: DOUBLING (a consonant) DROPPING (a silent e) CHANGING (a y to an […]

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WRTR for Parents: Lesson 3

3rd

This is a continuation of a parent series on WRTR. Section 3: Silent e’s The last section of page one is all of the silent E rules grouped together as “Rule 7.” 7.  There are five kinds of silent e’s. If you are familiar with Sound Beginnings, this section is easy: “Time” illustrates “job 1, […]

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