Thank you for visiting Little Schoolhouse in the Suburbs. Please subscribe and you'll get great homeschool tips sent to your inbox for free!

12459575414_e15b3e8941_z

With my dyslexic student, we have hit the wall over and over and over on the numerical geography facts in our curriculum.  So this year, I tried something new that REALLY paid off for us.  First, let me confess that I don’t really know why we memorize the exact heights of certain mountains and rivers; I’m sure it’s important for something, but I have one child that it’s JUST NOT HAPPENING.

So here’s something that generated great memory work, though not exactly as prescribed.  We did the ORDER of things instead of the exact numbers.  “Name the continents you’ve learned in order of size.”  “Name the continents you’ve learned in order of population.”  “Do it in reverse order of mountains.”

We have a world map on the wall.  “Show me the continents in order of population.”  “Point to the highest point on each continent.  What are the names?”

It went GREAT.  And, she knows the relationships between the continents better than my “good” number kid.

Unless someone can persuade me that ramming her head against the numbers over and over is desperately important, I’m sticking with this method.

{ 0 comments }



Thank you for visiting Little Schoolhouse in the Suburbs. Please subscribe and you'll get great homeschool tips sent to your inbox for free!

ILL Lesson 202

When we read DYOCC, we see that it’s author aimed MODG for her children attending Thomas Aquinas College, or one like it.  If you’ve never fooled around on that site, you need to.  The K-12 curriculum choices make a LOT of sense after you see it.  Here is the syllabus.  It’s a fixed curriculum.  Everyone basically follows the same course.  If you are planning to attend any kind of non-science graduate school, it would be a glorious foundation.  But, if you want a PhD in Genetics, I’m not sure that you can sail into grad school without some outside work.  Maybe you can.  I dunno.

But, if you’re the type of family that expects that a four year degree gets your child directly into a profession, (e.g., teaching grade school, work in a lab, be a nurse) this is not that kind of school.  College in my world is for getting a job, like immediately.  Grad school is a grown up thing you do while you’re working in the profession already.

So, does the K-12 curriculum still prepare you for “regular” college?  I would certainly think so.  Any classical education prepares you to navigate life better.  My one concern is science/math honors college.  I haven’t been to college in 20 years, so I don’t know how that works anymore, but family did the honors science route and continued to advanced degrees.  We did AP Biology, Physics, Calculus and got scholarships to honors colleges in our respective fields.  It would be GREAT if that was unnecessary for honors college programs.   I didn’t really “understand” a LICK of calculus, but I rocked that AP exam and skipped it in college.  I’m not sure that was a good thing.

Anyone have thoughts?

{ 2 comments }



Another Great Classical Ed Video

Philosophy

I’ve noticed in Classical Ed that certain things are made priorities without persuading ME, the teacher, that they are priorities (like “wonder” and “beautiful art and music”).  Other things (like science content) are suppressed without persuading ME that they should be suppressed.  I teach very poorly under those conditions. THIS video, like the one I […]

Read it →

Understanding Your Curriculum: Deep or Wide, or BOTH?

Philosophy

(Note: As I said before, this series makes me nervous. It seems my understanding of education grows and changes by the week and I’m afraid that I am about to say a bunch of dumb stuff. Please keep that in mind. This is all my “current” opinion.) Education communicates values and culture.  There’s no such […]

Read it →

Understanding Your Curriculum: Alone, Parent-Lead, or Straddler?

Philosophy

(Note: As I said before, this series makes me nervous. It seems my understanding of education grows and changes by the week and I’m afraid that I am about to say a bunch of dumb stuff. Please keep that in mind. This is all my “current” opinion.) Alone or Parent-Lead? Some curricula, like Sonlight, are […]

Read it →

Understanding Your Curriculum: Scheduled or Strewing?

Philosophy

  (Note:  I would just like to first say that this post series makes me nervous.  It seems my understanding of education grows and changes by the week and I’m afraid that I am about to say a bunch of dumb stuff.  Please keep that in mind. This is all my “current” opinion.) Every curriculum […]

Read it →

Updates to Freebies

Philosophy

All Do-Aheads and Printables are updated for this next school year. Added the updated Calendar of Liturgical resources Added links and instructions for 6GRD music Added links to flashcards for Science 3GRD and 4GRD. Updated our permanent rotation books.    

Read it →

BUY: Teaching Tips and Language Arts Overview

1st

This is a public service announcement:  If you use MODG curriculum, BUY those two resources from the school.  There is a lot of overlap between them, but they both contain information that would have SAVED MY SANITY. HOW did Laura do the literature?  Stratify the kids by grades (K-3)? Was the directed reading same or […]

Read it →

2015-2016 Liturgical Book Organizer

1st

I did these last year and they were really awkward to use all year for me, so I changed the format.  Hopefully, this will work better.  Again, all weeks start on Monday and end on Sunday so you can build up to that mass.    This year’s calendar for our personal favorites is free, but if […]

Read it →

2015 Reflections: Curriculum 3, 5, 6 GRD

3rd

I really liked the curriculum this year.  As I get further up in MODG, I find less and less I want to change.  It’s the early grades I dabble around in. 3GRD I need to remediate some reading issues, so I used an alternative to WRTR and PLL. Rather than the speed drills, I did […]

Read it →