Philosophy

Another Great Classical Ed Video

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I’ve noticed in Classical Ed that certain things are made priorities without persuading ME, the teacher, that they are priorities (like “wonder” and “beautiful art and music”).  Other things (like science content) are suppressed without persuading ME that they should be suppressed.  I teach very poorly under those conditions. THIS video, like the one I […]

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Understanding Your Curriculum: Deep or Wide, or BOTH?

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(Note: As I said before, this series makes me nervous. It seems my understanding of education grows and changes by the week and I’m afraid that I am about to say a bunch of dumb stuff. Please keep that in mind. This is all my “current” opinion.) Education communicates values and culture.  There’s no such […]

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Understanding Your Curriculum: Alone, Parent-Lead, or Straddler?

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(Note: As I said before, this series makes me nervous. It seems my understanding of education grows and changes by the week and I’m afraid that I am about to say a bunch of dumb stuff. Please keep that in mind. This is all my “current” opinion.) Alone or Parent-Lead? Some curricula, like Sonlight, are […]

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Understanding Your Curriculum: Scheduled or Strewing?

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  (Note:  I would just like to first say that this post series makes me nervous.  It seems my understanding of education grows and changes by the week and I’m afraid that I am about to say a bunch of dumb stuff.  Please keep that in mind. This is all my “current” opinion.) Every curriculum […]

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BUY: Teaching Tips and Language Arts Overview

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This is a public service announcement:  If you use MODG curriculum, BUY those two resources from the school.  There is a lot of overlap between them, but they both contain information that would have SAVED MY SANITY. HOW did Laura do the literature?  Stratify the kids by grades (K-3)? Was the directed reading same or […]

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Logic Gems in “Lost Tools of Learning”

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Dorothy Sayer’s “Lost Tools of Learning” has become the flagship essay for the Classical Education Movement.  I admit, she had me from the start: “Has it ever struck you as odd, or unfortunate, that today, when the proportion of literacy throughout Western Europe is higher than it has ever been, people should have become susceptible […]

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Grammar Gems in “The Lost Tools of Learning”

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In “The Lost Tools of Learning”, the flagship essay for the classical education movement, Dorothy Sayers builds her case for returning to a classical method of education and then outlines specifics for the stages.  The following is an abbreviated version of her comments  about the grammar stage along with how we employ them in our […]

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Classical Ed and Charlotte Mason’s Attainments for 6yr old

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It has been argued that since a CM education is essentially training in virtues and ideas, it shares a great deal in common with “Classical Education.” And since both MODG and CM rely heavily on “living books”, there should be significant overlap between the two curricula. The following comparison is based on “A Formidable List […]

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A Practical Look at Classical Education Stages

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  In the last post, I began a comparison between Classical Education and Classical Dance.  I argued that just like classical dance training prepares the body to excel at any movement based art, so classical education is meant to prepare the mind to excel at any intellectual subject.  Classical education has identified the mental movements […]

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Classical Ed is like Classical Dance

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  I have read so many articles about Classical Education, but in the end, I’m a practical girl and all that talk is a bit above me when we’re just trying to learn to read, so I’m going to break it down for you as best as I can. To me, classical education is like […]

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Motor Development: Scrubbing the Sink

Philosophy

Little Kid blew flour all over Grammy’s bathroom when I wasn’t looking. So, he learned to scrub a sink. This routine is a mixture of fun, responsibility, fine and gross motor skills, and practical living. It’s beautiful. It’s all kinds of pinching, squeezing, grasping, and twisting practice. Great for kids with trunk weakness, low grip […]

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